Skip to main content

TEAS, ACT, GED and Other Entrance Exams

Acess to videos and tutorials on student entrance exams and other useful hints

Who is required to take entrance exams?

Who is required to take a pre-enrollment assessment?

All certificate, diploma, and degree-seeking students, and those enrolling in math, reading, writing, or English Language Learner (ELL) courses are required to take a pre-enrollment assessment, unless exempt based upon one of the following:

  • A student who transfers to Central Community College from an accredited institution of higher education and who has earned a "C" or better in college-level English and math.

New students at Central Community College should complete a pre-enrollment assessment prior to meeting with a program adviser.

Please note that CCC Health Science programs require that ALL students complete a pre-enrollment assessment of ACCUPLACER or ACT. 

Registration in math and English courses requires assessment testing if the math and English prerequisites have not been met. 

If you would like to schedule an exam at any of the CCC locations, please call:

Columbus (402) 562-1206

Grand Island (308) 398-7378

Hastings (402) 461-2424

** Completing a pre-enrollment assessment is required to register for classes. Scores must be current from the last three (3) years. Visit www.cccneb.edu/assessment/ for test prep and exemptions.

The Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS Test) is a standardized, multiple choice exam for students applying for nursing school in the USA. It is often used to determine the ability of potential students to adjust to a nursing program. The test is created and administered by Assessment Technologies Institute.

On August 31, 2016, the TEAS V test was retired in favor of the newest version called ATI TEAS. While the difficulty is essentially the same, all components were updated to latest standards of the profession.

The exam is 209 minutes and consists of 170 questions, drawn from a TEAS Test Bank consisting of thousands of questions that are given on several versions of the exam.

The topics covered are reading, mathematics, science, and English language and usage. 

Wikipedia-Test of Essential Academic Skills

ATI TEAS EXAM

 

General Educational Development (GED) tests are a group of four subject tests which, when passed, provide certification that the test taker has American or Canadian high school-level academic skills.

Although the "GED" initialism is frequently mistaken as meaning "general education degree" or "general education diploma", the American Council on Education, which owns the GED trademark, coined the initialism to identify "tests of general educational development" that measure proficiency in science, mathematics, social studies, reading, and writing. Passing the GED test gives those who do not complete high school, or who do not meet requirements for high school diploma, the opportunity to earn their high school equivalency credential, also called a high school equivalency diploma, general equivalency diploma a high-school degree awarded by a series of examinations; also called GED as in the dictionary, in the majority of the United States, Canada, or internationally. In 2014, some states in the United States switched to alternate exams, HiSET and TASC.

The GED Testing Service is a joint venture of the American Council on Education. Pearson is the sole developer for the GED test. The test is taken on a computer and in person. States and jurisdictions award a Certificate of High School Equivalency or similarly titled credential to persons who meet the passing score requirements.

In addition to English, the GED tests are available in Spanish and in French in Canada, large print, audio, and braille. Tests and test preparation are also offered to persons incarcerated and on military bases in addition to more traditional settings. Individuals living outside the United States, Canada, or U.S. territories may be eligible to take the GED tests through Pearson Vue testing centers.

Wikipedia-General Education Development

The ACT (originally an abbreviation of American College Testing) college readiness assessment is a standardized test for high school achievement and college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, a nonprofit of the same name. It was first administered in November 1959 by Everett Franklin Lindquist as a competitor to the College Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test, now the SAT.

The ACT originally consisted of four tests: English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Natural Sciences. In 1989, the Social Studies test was changed into a Reading section (which included a Social Studies subsection) and the Natural Sciences test was renamed the Science Reasoning test, with more emphasis on problem solving skills. In February 2005, an optional Writing test was added to the ACT, mirroring changes to the SAT that took place later in March of the same year. In the spring of 2015, the ACT will start to be offered as a computer-based test that will incorporate some optional Constructed Response Questions; the test content, composite score, and multiple choice format will not be affected by these changes. The test will continue to be offered in the paper format for schools that are not ready to transition to computer testing.

 

The ACT has seen a gradual increase in the number of test takers since its inception, and in 2011 the ACT surpassed the SAT for the first time in total test takers; that year, 1,666,017 students took the ACT and 1,664,479 students took the SAT. All four-year colleges and universities in the U.S. accept the ACT, but different institutions place different emphases on standardized tests such as the ACT, compared to other factors of evaluation such as class rank, GPA, and extracurricular activities. The main four tests are scored individually on a scale of 1–36, and a Composite score is provided which is the whole number average of the four scores.

Wikipedia-ACT

Arithmetic

The Arithmetic test measures your ability to perform basic arithmetic operations and to solve problems that involve fundamental arithmetic concepts. There are three types of arithmetic questions:

  • Operations with whole numbers and fractions: topics included in this category are addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, recognizing equivalent fractions and mixed numbers, and estimating.
  • Operations with decimals and percents: topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with decimals. Percent problems, recognition of decimals, fraction and percent equivalencies, and problems involving estimation are also given.
  • Applications and problem solving: topics include rate, percent, and measurement problems, simple geometry problems, and distribution of a quantity into its fractional parts


College-Level Math

The College-Level Math test measures your ability to solve problems that involve college-level mathematics concepts. There are five types of college-level math questions:

  • Algebraic operations: topics include simplifying rational algebraic expressions, factoring, expanding polynomials, and manipulating roots and exponents.
  • Solutions of equations and inequalities: topics include the solution of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, equation systems, and other algebraic equations.
  • Coordinate geometry: topics include plane geometry, the coordinate plane, straight lines, conics, sets of points in the plane, and graphs of algebraic functions.
  • Applications and other algebra topics: topics include complex numbers, series and sequences, determinants, permutations and combinations, fractions, and word problems.
  • Functions and trigonometry: topics include polynomials, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic and trigonometric functions.


Elementary Algebra

The Elementary Algebra test measures your ability to perform basic algebraic operations and to solve problems involving elementary algebraic concepts. There are three types of elementary algebra questions:

  • Operations with integers and rational numbers: topics include computation with integers and negative rationals, the use of absolute values, and ordering.
  • Operations with algebraic expressions: topics include the evaluation of simple formulas and expressions, adding and subtracting monomials and polynomials, multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials, the evaluation of positive rational roots and exponents, simplifying algebraic fractions, and factoring.
  • Solution of equations, inequalities, and word problems: topics include solving linear equations and inequalities; solving quadratic equations by factoring; and solving verbal problems presented in an algebraic context, including geometric reasoning and graphing, and the translation of written phrases into algebraic expressions.


Reading Comprehension

The Reading Comprehension test measures your ability to understand what you read, to identify main ideas, make inferences, and distinguish between direct statements and secondary or supporting ideas.


Sentence Skills

The Sentence Skills test measures your understanding of sentence structure—what makes a sentence complete and clear. Some questions deal with the logic of a single sentence, and others with the relationships between sentences.


WritePlacer® (Written Essay)

The WritePlacer test measures your ability to write effectively, which is critical to academic success. Your score is based on your ability to express, organize, and support your opinions and ideas. The position you take on the essay topic doesn’t affect your score. The following five characteristics of writing will be considered:

  • Focus: The clarity with which you maintain your main idea or point of view.
  • Organization: The clarity with which you structure your response and present a logical sequence of ideas.
  • Development and Support: The extent to which you elaborate on your ideas and the extent to which you present supporting details.
  • Sentence Structure: The effectiveness of your sentence structure.
  • Mechanical Conventions: The extent to which your writing is free of errors in usage and mechanics.


English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Language Use

The English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Language Use test measures a student's proficiency in using correct grammar in English Sentences.

English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Listening

The English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Listening test measures the ability to listen to and understand one or more people speaking in English. Conversations take place in a wide range of locations including lecture halls, grocery stores, and libraries.

English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Reading Skills

The English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Reading Skills test measures a student's ability to read English through the comprehension of short passages.

English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Sentence Meaning

The English-As-A-Second Language (ESL) Sentence Meaning test measures how well students understand the meaning of sentences in English.

by The College Board

Accuplacer-Inside the Test

Live Chat