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Body Image

This guide will help you better understand body image issues in men, women, and children. It provides suggested resources and other information for beginning research on this topic.

Videos

As the idealized male physique continues to be hyped in movies, on TV, in magazines, and on billboards, a rapidly growing number of men are becoming obsessed with appearance. Each year alone, they spend billions on gym memberships and home exercise equipment—and women are no longer alone in battling anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder. This topical program explores some of the issues facing young men today as they struggle to define themselves amidst the flood of media-generated images of male physical perfection. Experts including Divya Kakaiya, the visionary founder and clinical director of the Healthy Within treatment center; Leigh Cohn, co-author of the seminal Making Weight: Men’s Conflicts with Food, Weight, Shape, and Appearance; and UCLA Health System sports medicine physician Gary Green as well as a number of young patients grapple with problems such as steroid abuse, eating disorders, exercise addiction, and phony food supplements. 

Teenage Girls

  
 
In a conversation set up by ABC News, a group of girls ages 15 to 17 talk about the stress in their lives as their mothers listen in.

In the search for a quick route to a muscular physique, many young men turn to controversial anabolic steroids to achieve their goals. But in the wake of deaths in the bodybuilding community, do the statistics showing a fourfold increase in their use, really add up?

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), occasionally still called dysmorphophobia, is a mental disorder characterized by the obsessive idea that some aspect of one's own body part or appearance is severely flawed and therefore warrants exceptional measures to hide or fix one's dysmorphic part on one's figure.In BDD's delusional variant, the flaw is imagined.If the flaw is actual, its importance is severely exaggerated. Either way, thoughts about the dysmorphia are pervasive and intrusive, and may occupy several hours a day. The DSM-5 categorizes BDD in the obsessive–compulsive spectrum, and distinguishes it from anorexia nervosa.

Films on Demand Service

There are a number of videos available on this subject, both on the internet and through our available databases. This page features some useful examples. For more, we recommend accessing the Films on Demand database.