Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Opioid Epidemic

This guide contains information on the misuse of and addiction to opioids. Additionally, it explains the "economic burden" of prescription opioid addiction, including the cost of addiction.

Films on Demand Service

There are a number of videos available on this subject, both on the internet and through our available databases. This page features some useful examples. For more, we recommend accessing the Films on Demand database.

Videos

It was touted as a miracle pill: a narcotic pain reliever that could change the lives of people suffering from chronic pain, but with little risk of addiction. How did a little pill that appeared in 1996 become so big, so fast? In 1998, Canadian sales were just a few million dollars; twelve years later they had soared to $243 million and U.S. sales were $3.5 billion. This film examines why medical schools, GPs and specialists in pain clinics readily embraced the drug at first, and why some have now changed their minds. The manufacturer has now stopped making it altogether, replacing it with a new formulation known as OxyNeo.

This program traces the causes behind the unprecedented growth in the use of prescription opioids and the devastating impact these drugs are having in virtually every part of America. It captures the story of the opioid crisis through personal stories and interviews with experts and reveals the tragic impact of the overuse of prescription painkillers on individuals, families, and communities.

The United States accounts for five percent of the world's population but consumes almost 70 percent of the total global opioid supply, creating an epidemic that has resulted in tens of thousands of deaths each year. How did we get here, and what can we do about it? In this personal talk, Travis Rieder recounts the painful, often-hidden struggle of opioid withdrawal and reveals how doctors who are quick to prescribe (and overprescribe) opioids aren't equipped with the tools to eventually get people off the meds.